Stay in shares after retirement

There are a number of important issues that someone in this position would need to consider.

Firstly, South Africa and most of the world is in a low-yield environment at the moment. Some countries are actually providing a negative yield on cash investments for the first time in history.

This has forced investors into higher risk asset classes like equities and property for the relatively higher yield they provide. At the same time, however, this has pushed up the valuations of these asset classes and many are now considered expensive. In turn, the relative yield on these asset classes have come under pressure as the prices have increased.

Secondly, even the current situation notwithstanding, equities are considered high risk compared to other asset classes. It is therefore important to establish what percentage exposure to equities is appropriate based on an investor’s risk profile and income requirements.

There are periods when equities do not perform and one must be able to stay invested for the long term and not be a forced seller for income purposes. This will ensure that one derives the full upside and value.

Thirdly, the dividend yield on South African equities is currently approximately 3%. That means that a R7 million equity portfolio would yield around R210 000 per annum. That is a shortfall of R490 000 every year on the R700 000 income required.

There are certain equities that provide a higher yield, but making changes will potentially incur capital gains tax and brokerage charges, which will lower the overall value of the investment. One must also consider the 15% tax on dividends when calculating the income that one will be receiving.

Fourthly, other asset classes like preference shares and bonds provide a higher income yield, however, their potential for capital growth is generally more limited than equities over longer periods. Bonds (fixed income) are also taxed at the investors’ marginal rate (potentially 41%) as opposed to the 15% tax on dividends for preference shares and equities.

Lastly, clients that have built a large capital base need to be realistic about the income these assets can provide. In this case R7 million might sound like a lot, but it is not enough to provide a sustainable income of R700 000 a year. To do that comfortably, one would need almost twice as much.

Investors in this or similar positions should therefore consider whether they might need to extend their working lives or lower their retirement expenditure.

It is also important that clients who are approaching retirement do not sell down all their equities, which provide long-term inflation-beating returns. People are living longer in their retirement years and must ensure their capital and income keep up with inflation. Meeting with a professional and gaining investment advice is a sound start in gaining direction and hopefully peace of mind.